Fort Gratiot Light

1825

LAKE HURON LIGHTS

Library of Congress PHOTO
(taken in 1900)
USCG PHOTO

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This light was put into service in 1825, but the workmanship was quite unprofessional.
The first structure succumbed to a violent storm in September, 1828 and was rebuilt by December, 1829.
The keeper's dwellings and fog-whistle building were added in 1874.

LOCATION: North entrance to St. Clair River, South end of Lake Huron

CURRENT TOWER LIT: 1829

CURRENT USE: Active aid to navigation

AUTOMATED: 1933

FOUNDATION MATERIALS: Dressed stone / timber

LIGHTHOUSE MATERIALS: 1825 --- Wood / 1829 --- Stone overlaid with Red brick

TOWER SHAPE: Conical --- originally 32ft, but became 74ft. when rebuilt in 1829 and then raised to 86ft. in 1861

COLOR(S)/MARKINGS/PATTERN: White --- but paint is wearing off and the red brick shows through, making the lighthouse appear to be speckled red

ORIGINAL LENS: Fifth Order, Fresnel (per USCG records) / Fourth Order, Fresnel 1857 (per Lighthouse List, 1858) / Third Order, Fresnel (per Lighthouse List, 1893)

NEAT CHARACTERISTICS: Named a Michigan Historic Site in 1971.
This light is the oldest light in Michigan whose first keeper was a federal government official, as were all keeper's in the 1800's.   It has retained the majority of its original equipment and is part of the Port Huron Coast Guard Station.
The tower is open to the public a few times a year --- phone the staff at the Lightship Huron (810-982-0891) for further information.