Eagle Harbor Light

1851

LAKE SUPERIOR LIGHTS

USCG PHOTO

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This bustling port for ore ships needed a light and received one in 1851.
But the harsh elements of Lake Superior took their toll and after only 20 years a new light was built in 1871.
A fog signal building was added in 1895, and a Life Saving Station began across the harbor in 1912.
This station received an electric power source for its Fourth Order beacon by 1939, but was still manned until 1980.

LOCATION: West side of Eagle Harbor, Keweenaw Peninsula, S side of Lake Superior

CURRENT TOWER LIT: 1871

CURRENT USE: Active aid to navigation

Additionally, the Keweenaw County Historical Society operates a nautical/historical museum in the lighthouse and surrounding buildings
mid-June through September, 12 noon - 5pm daily.

AUTOMATED: 1980

FOUNDATION MATERIALS: Dressed stone /Timber

LIGHTHOUSE MATERIALS: Brick

TOWER SHAPE: Octagonal integral --- 40 ft. tall

COLOR(S)/MARKINGS/PATTERN: This structure has a unique appearance --- the tower is white on the sides facing the lake, but the sides of the tower that are connected to the red dwelling are red as well.

ORIGINAL LENS: Outmoded lamp and 14" reflector / Fourth Order, Fresnel 1857 --- now has a modern aero-beacon

NEAT CHARACTERISTICS: In November, 1926, the station had an interesting and dangerous rescue: they received word about the Thomas Maytham hung up on the rocks some 40 miles away.  They reached and rescued the 22 member crew; but for reasons unknown, they decided to brave the worsening storm and below-zero temperatures and headed back for Eagle Harbor (instead of Mendota Light Station which was only 6 miles away).  It was a life-saving decision!  On the way home they spotted the Bangor which had run aground and rescued the 29 crew members from that ship.