Stannard Rock Light

1868

LAKE SUPERIOR LIGHTS

USCG PHOTO

LIGHTHOUSES OF MICHIGAN

The rock here was named for Captain Charles C. Stannard who spotted this more than mile-long dangerous reef in 1835.  A day beacon was finally put here in 1868 when the Soo Locks opened, and construction on a permanent light began in 1877 was finished in 1882.

LOCATION: On shoal at end of reef, 45 mi. N of Marquette, mid-Lake Superior

CURRENT TOWER LIT: 1882

CURRENT USE: Active aid to navigation

AUTOMATED: 1962

FOUNDATION MATERIALS: Crib

LIGHTHOUSE MATERIALS: Dressed limestone

TOWER SHAPE: Conical --- 102 ft. tall

COLOR(S)/MARKINGS/PATTERN: Natural with black lantern

ORIGINAL LENS: Third Order, Fresnel 1882 / Second Order, Fresnel (1893 Light List)

NEAT CHARACTERISTICS: Despite the presence of a lighthouse, this area of Lake Superior is still treacherous.  Due to its location, storms approaching Stannard Rock are able to build-up in intensity before hitting the light station.  One November a work crew of 12 men became trapped when a storm moved in quickly.  Ferocious winds blew sheets of pack ice, trapping the men for 7 days inside the lighthouse. It took them 2 days to chop their way out of the 12 feet of ice that imprisoned them and make it to the mainland.  This just goes to show that no matter how ingenious man thinks he is, he cannot control or predict nature --- lighthouses like Stannard Rock are merely warnings of it.